Nope, this is not another engagement post.

This summer has brought a huge life change for me; a change that has been difficult, emotional, scary, educational, and eye opening. At the beginning of this summer, I found out that I was pregnant.

When I found out about my pregnancy, I had a very hard decision to make that I spent a lot of time, energy, and emotions on in order to make the best decision for myself. The decision to continue or to end the pregnancy was one of the hardest decisions I have ever had to make. I am thankful, one, for my family and close friends who were extremely supportive towards whatever decision I was to make. This decision making process could have been A TON harder had it not been for people listening to my fears and desires for my future, and for that I am so grateful. I also am thankful that I live in a country that gives me the right to make that choice as well as provides me with (somewhat) equal ability and resources to make a decision that life changing. (Progress still is to be made!)

After I made the decision to continue my pregnancy, I was, and to be honest, some days still am, very ashamed of what my life looks and will look like. However, I understand that life as I have known it is no longer about just me, and I thought of what it would look like to look back and feel that my mom was ashamed of her decisions which resulted with me, and I feel that I can no longer live being dragged down by the shame of my past decisions. I wanted to post this because I no longer feel that it is something I should hide or feel guilty about. I have also come around to really be ready to love and care for this new alien.

I understand that I will be doing this parent life, which will include a lot of Kraft Mac-N-Cheese, popsicles, and guidance from Lorelai Gilmore (because that is all I know at the moment, kidding!), by myself as a college grad student living off a pretty non-existent income with a professional volleyball player sized savings (LOL), but I have the support of my family and friends, as well as the faith that my hard work and trust in this new life path will end up being a silver lining. I am totally scared most days and completely unaware of what the future holds for me and this new addition (plus bonus hormones!), but I know that I will do my best to raise the most bad ass and most loved kid out there (while finishing grad school and staying half sane… I might write a book).

I know this pregnancy was not a part of my plan that I had for this time in my life, but I have embraced this life change to make sure that this kid knows he/she never was and never will be unwanted. Although I have been doing this alone, because of my family and close friends – I have never really felt completely alone, and for that I am so indescribably grateful. All of the calls, texts, pregnant lady jokes, sending me pizza, and just being there to listen means so much. Also, thanks to my sister Taylor, who lives with me and is ALWAYS there (whether she wants to be or not ha!), and who doctors constantly confuse as my husband (not because of her looks but because of our shared last name). If you have any questions or want to know the truth of what happens to you after 4 months of being pregnant (like what a day without 3+ cups of coffee is like), please feel free to reach out!

Advertisements

Female Volleyball Players = Expert Wedgie Pickers

A few weeks ago, my roommate, an ice-hockey player, came to my game. The reaction she had to possibly her first volleyball game ever was: “You guys pick your wedgies a lot.” I really didn’t think about it before she had mentioned anything and then I realized, having to wear spandex all the time creates a lot of situations for picking wedgies (your spandex ride up, move around, etc.) I then thought about how routine picking a wedgie has gotten for me in all aspects of life, at any given location: formal or informal, which ultimately made me realize that maybe I should be more private about picking wedgies.

As I write this post, I am feeling like I may be giving you all too much of an inside look into my life, but so far my life has been volleyball and sleeping, so little details become very exciting for me.

The end of regular season is approaching, as we play our last match on Sunday before playoffs begin. It is crazy to me how far I have come from the beginning of the season. I have gotten close, really close, with some of my teammates as I have seen them twice a day almost every single day I have been here. So close that now we all notice even the tiniest, most minuscule changes in each other’s lives. For example, I got new sweatpants for myself for Valentine’s Day (not your basic huge sweats.. classy, sleek, and modern sweats). The first day I wore them, everyone said something about the new sweats. If someone dyes their hair or gets a trim, it really is noticeable. I, for some strange reason, always end up with one sock right-side-out and one sock inside-out. I am a lazy laundry lady, so I never really take the time to change all the socks to their right side, but my teammates have picked up on that. One day a few weeks ago, I must have had both socks inside out and it was like everyone and their mother noticed it. I didn’t even notice it, and that is saying something about how observant my teammates are. I can count on them to notice everything from a new pair of shorts to a new thong, and that is how close I have gotten with all of them.

Not much is new in my life, so I thought I would give you an inside scoop into some of the language barrier situations I face on a daily basis. First, I want to say my coach tries very, very hard to speak English, and I know he is not the most comfortable with the language. Sometimes he mixes things up and it gets confusing, but you learn to just nod your head and try to figure out what he means, sometimes after being yelled at multiple times, but you figure it out nonetheless. Maybe telling you won’t be as entertaining as it is in person, but a few situations stick out in my head. First – when my coach explains a drill that requires a complicated points system, for example, we will play a game where running certain plays get you more than 1 point, so you can work on those specific plays, but also scrimmage normally. I have never been so confused in my life during the explanation of these drills. My coach will start to explain (“one point for this, if this happens, you get 3 more chances to score, if you lose the other team gets two chances to score, etc.”) and we all look around after he explains to see if anyone knows what is going on, and we all have no clue. Second – the mix up between today and tomorrow. My coach tends to mix these two terms up, which makes it challenging to understand when certain events and practices are going to happen. (at morning practice, my coach could say practice tomorrow at 16.00 and that could/probably means practice today at 16.00)  Third – the mix up between yours and theirs. During video, my coach will tell us if the team we are going to play has gotten better or worse since we played them last. He will say things like “your level go very down” which means “the other team hasn’t gotten better since we last played them”, but it sounds like he is telling us we suck. We have figured it out as of late that the your means their level go very down. Fourth – and my all time favourite – my coach says LEX instead of LEGS, which can make me paranoid when I am not paying attention and I hear the word “lex.” A few months ago, the passers were doing a drill where your partner chunks a ball and you have to shuffle backwards, get your body around the ball, and pass it to the target. My coach was yelling “move your lexi’s” and it absolutely made my life.

Finally, I got sick for the first time and I have been surprisingly not soft about it. I figured this is the time I would get all homesick and yes, I really wanted my mom to bring me food to my bed, but without a caretaker, this means you can create your own sick people diet. Today, to make myself feel better I had loads of honey nut cheerios, honey-chili almonds, tiramisu covered almonds, dried coconut, chocolate covered almonds, toffee, 3 loaves of rye bread, carrot soup, and a lot of ibuprofen. I do believe I am the best caretaker I have.

More life updates to come after playoffs begin. Until next time!

Mental Marijuana

I am not a normal player. The thought of game day, most times, does not make me feel hype, I usually feel my stomach in my throat and also get this weird paralyzation action where my mind is so spazzed out I move at the speed of an average-paced turtle. After not playing in actual games since my collegiate season ended in December 2013, I forgot how nervous I got. This season I have really struggled with performing my best in games, but I have started to find some great solutions to this problem.

If I listen to loud, screamy music and if I scream and yell during warmups, I get way too jumpy and spazzy for the game. At Michigan, we read this leadership book and this chapter was about finding your “number.” All of the yelling and getting hype stuff makes my number skyrocket to a 10. It is funny to me, because I can totally feel it. Every play seems so much harder and I somehow get the lung capacity of an infant, taking the shortest breaths of all time. I need mental marijuana before I play. I don’t actually smoke (that would make things really difficult), but for me, to find my appropriate “number,” I need to get to a complete state of relaxation. I need to sing songs, slow, relaxing songs in my head while I am standing waiting for the other team to serve. I need to basically numb my mind, or else it will think way too much about every tiny thing. My point of this whole randomness, is I have finally found my mental marijuana, relaxing state in games (only 7 months out! LOL). In all seriousness though, my practices and games are starting to look very similar, which is just groovy.

The past months and the next months, my life will be pretty much only volleyball. So, if this bores you, I am sorry, I don’t have any good travelling or foodie stories.

Here in Finland, I have had a lot a lot a lot of alone time. I have realized things about myself that I might not have discovered had I been in the states with all of my friends. First: I did not realize how much FOMO I have (FOMO: fear of missing out). In college, I had a FOMO for sure, but the thing is, in college if someone says, “oh you missed out on so much last night,” you can always go out the next night or weekend and have so much fun it didn’t matter how much you missed out on the weekend before. In Finland, I get to see all of these great parties and events back in the States, and now, instead of making up for missing out the next weekend, I tell myself that soon, in 150, 85, 68 short days, I can make up for it. Second: I really love the grocery store. I don’t know why, but I don’t feel like my day is complete without going to the grocery store. I am laughing at myself and maybe I am in such a small town that the grocery store is a banger of a time for me, but I love going. Third: When I get excited about something, I drop everything and have an excitement panic attack. For example, I had this idea that my christmas present to my dad should be a brewery tour in Houston. I spent all afternoon researching the best ones and texted him a ton of times to see if he would want to go with me, etc. I also get little spurts of excitement looking for jobs. If I get excited enough, I spend all day researching jobs and e-mailing companies. On the other hand, If I ignore the excitement, I get tons of butterflies. This has been particularly hard, because when I get back to the states, the first thing I will be going to is a college reunion-ish thing, and when I get excited about it, I get so much energy before bed. It makes sleeping hard.

We just played a game yesterday against the 3rd place team in the league and won in 5. I discovered I am kind of a bad-ass, but it is all 100 percent internal. So, there are a few girls on this other team that appear to be very cocky. Cocky in volleyball is like yelling through the net at the other team when you get a point or laughing at the other team when they lose a point. I am aware that many athletes, athletes of all sports, are cocky and this helps them have the confidence they need to perform, but if you are cocky, chances are I hate playing against you. I am my hardest critic and never feel satisfied about my play, so seeing people who act like they are all that and a bag of chips really pisses me off. I know this is wrong, but it’s me. Anyways, these girls are just straight up yelling through the net and in my mind, I’m thinking I appear to be giving off the vibe of “yeah bitch, you wanna yell through the net? Check the score and how many points you have actually scored in this game.” In my head, I think I look like this tough, hard ass, but what I actually look like is this calm, smiley, gentle player. My coach is teaching me some bad-ass italian hand signals that I can start to use in the game to improve the gentle giant exterior.

We have one more month left of regular season, and are doing really well. We are currently in second, which is awesome. I am learning more and more italian hand gestures each day. I also am learning a lot of Finnish words, but only ones that start with a P. I learned the word “butterfly” in Finnish because we do a drill called butterfly almost every other day, and it is “perhonen.” My teammates name is Piia Kerhonen, so naturally I started calling her Piia Perhonen. Then, my other teammates started giving me new P words to add to her name, so that’s the logic behind my Finnish vocabulary.

I will be watching the Super Bowl next weekend with my roommate who is the biggest Patriots fan of all time. She loves Tom Brady, so she secretly goes blue even though she went to BC. Have a great week all!

Fun Fact: I spent 15 Euros on candy last Sunday

I realize it has been a long time since I have posted anything.. and so much has happened since my last post. I haven’t really had much time off lately, so I will try to catch y’all up briefly.

First – I got to visit my cousin in Berlin. Long story short, my team made it to the second round of the EuroCup, which was to be played in Russia (against a kickass team that won the thing), but my visa would not go through in time for the game, so I had a few days to travel. This ended up being an amazing foodie adventure. I LOVE food. I freaking love all of it, crazy food, ethnic food, breakfast food, any food. I follow more food accounts than human ones on Instagram now just so I can see the delicious food of America waiting for me (out of those food accounts, most of them are donut shops). Eating out in Finland is not cheap and I think I can count on my hand the amount of times I have eaten at a restaurant. When I went to Berlin, food was incredibly cheap. My cousin and I dedicated my last day simply to going to the Christmas Market and tasting all of the food (pizza, cheesy bread, pancakes, mulled wine, you name it). It was great to get to central Europe and relax, I really enjoyed my time there.

Second – for EuroCup we played the Russian team; first in Russia, then they came to play here. This was by far the best match I have been a part of in my life (and we played Penn State twice every year!). On this Russian team was apparently the world’s top outside hitter, a lot of members of the Russian National Team, and a Brazilian who had won the gold medal in the Olympics. I definitely felt like a peasant playing them, but it was a really cool experience to play such great players.

Third – Christmas. I did not have much time off for Christmas break either, but the time I did have off, my team/staff were so nice to invite me to their houses, so I could celebrate with them. In Finland, Santa comes and the whole shebang happens on the evening of the 24th. Imagine as a kid having to sit through dinner to wait for Santa to bring your presents! (Fun Fact: in Finland, people sometimes hire a dress up Santa to come to their house for their kids!) So, on the 24th, my trainer took me over to her house for some glogi (mulled wine, vodka, and spices) and dinner. It was really nice and I really loved glogi. I loved glogi so much that during the Christmas sauna, I decided to try a typical Finnish swim in the snow to cool off. The next day my teammate, Noppi, picked me up in the morning to go to her mom’s apartment. They recreated the typical Finnish Christmas (as if it was the 24th) for me, which was so cool; I am really grateful for them. The meal (this is the same every year, the foods don’t change): first, we had a lot of raw fish like lox, herring, etc. Since wine doesn’t go well with this stuff, somehow Noppi’s mom already knew I liked beer (I guess Noppi had told her we had drank a few together) and insisted that I have the best Finnish beer there is: Sandel’s. Then the next course was hams and cheeses and salads. Finally, the actual dinner was ham, a lot of casseroles (cabbage, carrot, potato), and beets, pickles, etc. After dinner, I was sitting on the couch when Noppi’s mom was teaching me these Finnish Christmas songs. After we sang a few, out comes Noppi’s sister dressed as Santa and this Santa brought me some sweet Finnish gifts, like a Christmas cookie cutter in the shape of Finland and some Finnish Fazer Chocolate. She also got me a kid’s book with all the Finnish Christmas songs AND it is a music book so if I press buttons it plays the tunes of the songs! Another Finnish tradition is visiting the cemetery. If you have had a family member pass away, you light a candle and say a few words on Christmas. When we went, the cemetery was so beautiful with the snow and the candles. We went back to Noppi’s house and on the table was all kinds of cookies and pastries. My favourite was this date bread. I really have no portion control, so if you leave out 1 cookie, I will only eat 1, but if you leave out 30 cookies, somehow my stomach can handle all 30. It’s a blessing and a curse. Impressive, but dangerous for one’s health. I am really so thankful for the people who made my Christmas here so memorable. Yes, I did get soft talking to my family back home, and my mom made me say hi to every single family member while that was happening, but what can I say? Who doesn’t look hotter when they are crying?

Fourth – the rest is kinda just random. Personally, I can honestly say I have never felt more exhausted (physically, mentally, emotionally) in my life. With all of the injuries on my team, I have been lucky to be healthy, but this also means that I have had a lot less time to recover. With that being said, yes I do workout a ton, but Noppi, Riikka, and her boyfriend Panu find time to celebrate another week of survival by buying candy and drinking wine. I have this limit I usually set at the candy store (my life is so exciting!) of 2-3 Euros because it is by the weight of your candy (3-4 euros was obviously a bad day, 3-4 euros plus a mini ice cream.. you can probably guess). Last Sunday we played a hard game in the Finnish Cup Finals, and so we went to the candy store naturally. The lady told us the store was closing, so we all got really nervous like the world was going to end if we didn’t try everything and our bag ended up weighing 15 EUROS! How does this happen? I tell myself it all went to my boobs or some body part like my tiny calves or head that really need it.

3 months until I am back.. crazy. I cannot say it enough, but I would really like to think I have the best family and the best friends back home, because they have been so great to keep me in the loop with their lives, make sure I am surviving, send me funny jokes (that mean tons, I usually laugh out loud), etc. I am so excited to see everyone in person, but also gonna Finnish strong here (I am so punny)!

In Lieu of Thanksgiving

Funny fact to start: I made this Food Menu plan for this week because Thanksgiving got the best of me and today’s menu read:

  • Breakfast: overnight oats/chia seeds/banana
  • Lunch: Salad, Fish
  • Snack: Advent candy and 1/2 banana (chug water)
  • Dinner: cauliflower pizza, salad, 2 apples

What really happened:

  • Breakfast: overnight oats
  • Lunch: Salad, Fish
  • Snack: Advent Candy and 1/2 banana and lots of water
  • Dinner: cauliflower pizza, salad, 2 apples, 2 clementines, 4 spoonfuls of cookie butter, 6 gingerbread cookies, a handful of candy corn, 1 more spoonful of cookie butter

So, this past week was Thanksgiving, and ever since Ally Sabol and I watched Hoosiers and ate chile rellenos in my South Quad dorm room alone freshman year, without anyone else occupying a room in the whole building, it has become my favourite holiday. Each year in college, we would have practice in the morning and then after I got to feast with my classmates and their amazing and extremely entertaining families. It was always a time filled with too much wine, end of Big Tens, and the only football game we got to seriously tailgate for, the OSU/UM game.

This year was no different. I am so so so lucky that my mom got to come for the entire week to visit me 🙂 We got to catch up and cook a ton of food together, which actually went pretty smoothly, minus a minor turkey freakout when we realized my oven might not be big enough for that sucker to fit in there. We decided that we should invite my team since they have never experienced Thanksgiving since here it is not really a thing, so I just threw it out there that we were gonna feast and anyone could come if they wanted. In seconds my phone was blowing up, and ultimately my entire team said they would be there along with the team’s masseuse, Tuija. We were about to attempt cooking Thanksgiving for 16 people, and up to this point, the most complicated food I had prepared for myself was a sunny side up egg. BUT, I am not lying when I say this was the best Thanksgiving food I have ever eaten. The beautiful, beautiful turkey, the carrot soufflé, the potatoes, the pies, even the brussel sprouts were top notch. I am so thankful that everything turned out and my team got to all hang out together!

Speaking of things I am thankful for, here are a few things I am thankful for that have happened over the last couple months: my mom (I really did not want her to leave), my coaches because on Thanksgiving they decided in practice that my position would hit around 300 balls each (straight for 1.5 hours), so I did it with a smile thinking of the extra pieces of pie that were to come, my grandpa who made my day by not understanding how to use FaceTime in any way and held the phone to his nose, my new italian speaking teammate who informed me that retardo is not “retard” in italian.. it means “late” (all this time I thought my coach kept saying “Lexi, you are a little retardo”), alone time that allows me to sing and dance to JT in my apartment in half-calfs and huge T-shirts, evaporated milk, I could drink that stuff, new friends and being forced to sit in a car while spinning out/drifting in the snow, dive bars, SAUNAS, and my mom trusting me enough to drive stick through the streets of Hämeenlinna. Thankfully (ha), I am a natural.

Note: One thing I am not thankful for is Usher, who cancelled his show in Helsinki. I know it’s cold, but damn.

Volleyball is going well, we only have one loss in the league and are still in second. This coming week, we play in Russia for the EuroCup, however, I will not be going because apparently it is 2-3 thousand Euros for an American to get a Russian Visa for a 4 day visit. I am getting used to playing in a skirt, however, those things are not made for those who might have larger than average asses.

Finland is beautiful in the winter and I am really excited to do all the cool winter-y things. I have my chai tea latte mix, hot cocoa mix, coffee, and sleepy time tea all ready for the cold months ahead.

 

Celebrity Shot

Hello friends, allow me to introduce myself. My name is Taylor, and I am one of Lexi’s two younger sisters. I am currently a junior at Emory University, which funny story, someone giving a presentation yesterday mentioned as being a “Top 20 University”. Truth be known we’ve dropped to 21…a fact that many of us (including myself) are extremely bitter about. We’re curing Ebola for crying out loud; I think that deserves a ranking too young to order its own drinks.


Anyways, this week we decided to switch blogs. I am actually the author of another blog, focused on dealing with the struggles of being a Christian in college. It’s called Faith and Risk. But this week I’m attempting to channel my inner Mindy Kaling and make people laugh, which has always been Lexi’s job. I have been given the huge honor of being able to say “Yeah you know those professional athletes? Well I’m related to one.” But I think the best way to describe my feelings toward my sister being a whole world away is to explain it in the stages I’ve experienced so far.


Stage #1: There was the day when she accepted. I still remember it like a fresh #tbt on Instagram. Hannah (our youngest sister), Lexi and I had decided to go play bingo for a night. You don’t think bingo is for young people? Imagine a room full of 500 people with an average age of 25, bringing in boxes of pizza, bottles of cheap liquor, and a heart full of the hope of winning a blackout bingo board worth $400. It’s a serious business. Lexi opened an email containing her contract, and I videotaped her responding “yes”. Seconds later, I won the blackout bingo board. Good night? The best.


Stage #2: The packing up day. As my title of the “stylish” Erwin implies, I have historically been the closet that gets the most stolen out of it. But this was MY day to steal. All of the clothes too cold to take to Santa’s Village? Mine. The non-essentials? Mine. A sweet pair of rain boots? Checkmate. I currently am wearing a super oversized sweater that was Lexi’s, so thanks sis. Owe that one to you and your closet. We laughed all day as we looked up how to say words like “beer” and “bar” on the Finnish translator app and also when we had to unpack EVERY suitcase to try to find some sleeping pills my mom had packed in there for the plane…not sure if we ever located them.


Stage #3: My current stage. Luckily thanks to technology, I am still very connected with my sister, whether it’s iMessage or FaceTime or her sending me her classic snapchats, you know the ones of a close up of her face. (Oh yeah. The best part of waking up isn’t Folgers in your cup; it’s Lexi’s snaps on your phone) I am doing my best to be the supportive little sister I should be, because holy crap who gets to say they played PROFESH volleyball in Europe every day? But what we both didn’t realize was what exactly this separation would be like for both she and her family. For us, it’s kind of like she went back to UMich, but there is no Rick’s in Finland (to my knowledge). She is literally braving the storm for the next five months, and we all miss her more than anything. For me I would say I miss her more than Netflix, because that’s when you know it’s real. So Lex, I love and miss you and am so proud of you. Näkemiin ladies and gents.

All-You-Can-Eats make me smile

As I start to write this post, I realise that last night I snap chatted me eating an entire pint of Ben and Jerry’s, so it really doesn’t help the credibility of this blog post about my eating, but everyone can have cheat day(s) and it was the Greek yogurt kind, so it was the good fats (all 46g of them).

First, I will talk about the Finnish food/food culture in general. The food here is really not that different than food in the US, however; from what my teammates tell me, food in Europe is much healthier than the states because of the stricter food regulations. Pretty much everything here is all natural, for example, they don’t have a big selection of the fake butter, anything “fat free” or “diet” because they don’t use a lot of chemicals in their foods. The typical Finnish meal, from what I am told, is: bread, salad, POTATOES, and beef (sometimes reindeer), and the people put jelly on the beef. Salmon is also really popular and cheap, as there are a lot of lakes, it is more popular than chicken. There is always a salad bar! It is awesome. Wherever you eat, once you order your meal, you can hit the all-you-can-eat salad buffet. My teammates know I love buffets more than most other things (especially breakfast ones), so every time we eat at a buffet they all ask me how excited I am. Things that all Fins eat a lot of: bread. There are always baskets and baskets of bread before every salad bar. Coffee: I love this part of the culture and will bring it back with me. After every meal, there is coffee time. This is the part of the meal where you get your coffee, sip it slow, and get to catch up with whoever you are with. Pineapples are eaten with salad, chicken, pizza, everything. Cottage cheese is this new thing I am really into, except from what I remember in the states, people usually eat it with fruit, kind of like a dessert. Here, it is what you put on your salad. Dessert Pudding: this is harder to explain what this actually is. After the meal, restaurants usually have a mixed berry cream pudding, but I think someone told me it is made from cottage cheese. It tastes like a sweet berry cloud if you could imagine what a cloud tastes like.

A huge part of Finnish culture is the candy culture. I have never seen so many candy stores in my life, and I am a sweets fanatic on a mission to seek out any and every sweet shop available to me. If I have to choose a last meal on this earth it will be an entire carrot cake with cream cheese icing, Zingerman’s size. So, I love sweets and so do the Fins. There are candy dispensers (the ones where you use the scooper and weigh your candy) in grocery stores, in gas stations, pretty much everywhere, and the worst part is they strategically place them right before the checkout. (I am becoming addicted to chewing gum in the grocery store, so I resist the temptation of the sexy chocolate covered toffees staring right into my soul). Another sweet that I love from Finland is pullah. Pullah is this pastry that is kind of like pull-apart bread with jelly inside.

So, this is how Fins eat, but I became aware my first couple weeks here that this is not how volleyball players eat. We had a meeting with our coaches in the first few weeks about food and how our body and what we eat is part of our job. They also said we eat way too much bread (LOL). I never thought about this before because at Michigan if I wanted cheesy bread, I ordered it. If I wanted Franzia (you know you’re broke when you want Franzia), I drank it. I never really understood this concept, until now. If I eat shitty before practice, I feel really shitty in practice. If I don’t eat enough before practice, I feel like a zombie with no brain and the slowest reaction times ever. It’s funny to me, because some of you may be working all day on whatever you work on in an office, but because we get our body fat measured pretty often, eating is my work. Kinda cool, kinda weird. (And yes, on saturdays I eat 5 donuts if I want to.)

I am realising this wasn’t my funniest post, I apologise, but here are some highlights of my past weeks. I gambled for the first time and won 3 Euros. I got really nervous after I won twice (betting a whopping .20 cents) and decided to stop. I played badminton with these 3 guys and it was a really hard workout. Badminton is no joke and there is a lot of trash talk! I won one game and the other games I lost 21-6, they really had no mercy on the noob. I am have really been thankful for my family lately, who, even when I am not feeling my best, remind me of my strengths. A new bar opened in the city and it is much more age appropriate for my teammates and I. I am also looking forward to when we actually make it to the karaoke bar, because I made a promise that I would sing the Finnish National Anthem for my song. We play in Austria in 2 weeks and I am really excited to travel and see a new country!

Time to catch up on The Mindy Project! Moi!